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How the north was made—and unmade

Industrialisation—and its delicine—have forged the psyche of the modern northerner

By Chris Moss   December 2020
Knocking out the chocks before its launch in Sunderland, 1954 Credit: (Tyne and Wear Archives and Museum/Flickr)

Knocking out the chocks before its launch in Sunderland, 1954 Credit: (Tyne and Wear Archives and Museum/Flickr)

The north-south divide is a cliché as much as it is a genuine geographical schism. It can be easily reduced to Thatcher vs the miners or become a convenient peg for accounts highlighting the brilliance of Mancunian pop music, Yorkshire fiction or Wigan pies (usually penned by northerners based in the capital).

Shunning simplifications and panegyrics,…

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