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Corporate control

New Labour has created a new "corporate populist" style of governing. It gets things done. But it is no way to run a democracy, especially one embarking on a big programme of constitutional reform. The exit of Peter Mandelson-the father of corporate populism-may strengthen its opponents

By Anthony Barnett   February 1999

One of the great puzzles of the English is the way most of us still insist that nothing really changes. Even after Thatcher upturned the economy and modernised British society with exceptional brutality, we still tell each other that politics will continue much as before. Even as the Scottish Parliament and the Human Rights Act alter 300 years of parliamentary rule, we reassure ourselves that such reforms do not interest people and do not really matter. Even when Peter Mandelson rockets to the height of fame and influence and then plunges back to earth in an 18th century parabola of…

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