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Barrie Kosky: the stereotype of the malicious opera director is dangerous

Ahead of his Glyndebourne debut, the Australian director defends Covent Garden's controversial William Tell

By Sameer Rahim  
Barrie Kosky (left) rehearses with conductor Ivor Bolton ahead of Glyndebourne's Saul © Richard Hubert Smith

Barrie Kosky (left) rehearses with conductor Ivor Bolton ahead of Glyndebourne's Saul © Richard Hubert Smith

Barrie Kosky is one of the most distinctive directors working in opera. His 2011 production of Castor and Pollux found a homo-erotic subtext in Rameau’s baroque music drama, and featured plentiful amounts of onstage nudity. His visually inventive Magic Flute, which goes to the Edinburgh Festival this year, is more  immediately crowd-pleasing. So what does he have in store…

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