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You cannot feed poor children decently with a profit-driven approach

It’s possible to keep deprived children well-nourished during lockdown. But the meagre food parcels delivered to struggling families are nowhere near sufficient

By Rachel Sylvester  

Credit: @RoadsideMum

A single tin of baked beans, two potatoes, five pieces of fruit, a loaf of bread, two carrots, a handful of pasta, some cheese slices, one tomato, two pieces of malt loaf and three tubes of yoghurt. This was the sum total of the ingredients contained in a food parcel handed out to feed children lunch for two weeks, according to Twitter user @RoadsideMum. Shockingly, she put the value of these goods at little more than £5, when the boxes given to those on free school meals are supposed to be worth over £30. The provider disputes the details…

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