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Web wars

As all sides in the WikiLeaks saga race to protect their privacy, internet users will lose theirs

By Bill Thompson   February 2011

The long-term political fallout of the WikiLeaks affair may be more limited than Julian Assange and his supporters would have hoped, but the furore has acted as a catalyst for an unprecedented effort by governments and companies to manage the flow of online information. The eventual impact on the way both sides—those with secrets, and those who wish to reveal them—use the web will be evident. Expect a radically secured, much more tightly-controlled internet, and a growing struggle for the upper hand in the battle for secrecy.

What will change? For a start, we will see major alterations in the…

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