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Forgotten by whom? Why it’s more important than ever to remember the Roma Holocaust

Often reduced to a footnote, activists have fought to keep memories of the Roma and Sinti genocide alive. Now, with anti-Roma sentiment rising across Europe, could the untold stories of the archive finally be heard?

By Sydnee Wagner   March 2020

Margarete Kraus, a Czech Roma, photographed after the war by Reimar Gilsenbach. Photo: Wienar Holocaust Library Collections

If you asked me what I learned in my public education about Roma and Sinti genocide during the Holocaust, it would be a lie to tell you I was taught nothing. I remember it vividly in my Texas high school World History textbook, the small footnote that included Roma and Sinti victims as an asterisk, a tacked-on fact that labelled us “gypsies” with a lower-cased G. There was no further explanation. Omitted from the main narrative, it would have been easy for anyone to miss. Nevertheless, as a Roma woman, it was the first time I saw any non-Roma…

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