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Is antisemitism a progressive blindspot?

In discussions of identity politics, one group always seems left out argues a new book

By Keith Kahn-Harris  
Jonathan Arkush, President, Board of Deputies of British Jews, speaks during a protest against anti-Semitism in the Labour party in Parliament Square in 2018 Credit: Yui Mok/PA Archive/PA Images

Jonathan Arkush, President of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, speaks during a protest against antisemitism in the Labour Party in Parliament Square in 2018 Credit: Yui Mok/PA Archive/PA Images

Last October, the Guardian’s Hadley Freeman tweeted: “Question: would addressing bigotry against any other minority be seen as an unfortunate distraction from the bigger picture, or is it just antisemitism?” Novara Media’s Ash Sarkar tweeted a response that concluded “…spare me the ‘any other minority shite,’” following up with: “it is just a complete fiction to suggest that trans people, Muslims, black people, the GRT community, exist in some kind of privileged bubble in which harm against them is widely recognised and their pain taken seriously.” Freeman’s response to Sarkar was that the “any other minority” referred to the…

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