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What the Juno mission to Jupiter could tell us

“Our fate seems closely dependent on the nearest and greatest of the gas giants”

By Philip Ball  

From left to right, Goeff Yoder, Diane Brown, Scott Bolton, Rick Nybakken, G. Beutelschies, and Steve Levin in a post-orbit insertion briefing at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory following the solar-powered Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter on Monday July 4, 2016 in Pasadena, Calif ©Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP/Press Association Images

From left to right, Goeff Yoder, Diane Brown, Scott Bolton, Rick Nybakken, G. Beutelschies, and Steve Levin in a post-orbit insertion briefing at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory following the solar-powered Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter on Monday July 4, 2016 in Pasadena, Calif ©Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP/Press Association Images From left to right, Goeff Yoder, Diane Brown, Scott Bolton, Rick Nybakken, Guy Beutelschies and Steve Levin in a post-orbit briefing at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California, after the team’s Juno spacecraft entered orbit around Jupiter on 4th July, 2016©Ringo H.W.…

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