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Revenge porn, slut-shaming and jealousy—how the ancient Romans wrote about love

Like a lot of literature from the past, it reads a little differently post #MeToo.

By Charlotte Higgins   March 2019

Illustration: Kate Hazell

The Greeks invented love, the Romans invented relationships. Obviously, that isn’t literally true, but in terms of (one branch of) literary tradition it could be said to be. Sappho was the Greek poet-in-chief of longing. Her fragmentary works—only one poem has survived complete from the 7th century BC—are sharp little shards of desire and yearning. Somehow they are made all the more intense by being so fragmentary, because they have desire built into them—not just the…

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