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Policy report: The digital future

Our lives have moved online. Public policy must adapt

By Tom Clark   October 2020

Image: Pixabay

A mere generation ago in the 1990s, junior politicians who wanted to sound modern in their speeches would drop in a mention of the “information superhighway.” The audience would look blank, and the speaker would sound baffled too, as he or she relayed that technical wizards were saying it might just be the route to the future.

In the years that followed, we all began to encounter first email, then Google, Wikipedia and perhaps iTunes in day-to-day life. But where politics was concerned, the…

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