Ironies of EU history

Hegel once wrote that “the owl of Minerva spread its wings only with the falling of dusk.” Personally, I was never too sure what he meant by that, but I think it had something to do with history’s habit of playing nasty little tricks on the unsuspecting. In Brussels, few are better placed to reflect on this than Klaus Regling, Hegel’s fellow countryman and the top civil servant in the economic and financial affairs department of the commission. In a previous incarnation, Regling was the chief adviser to Theo Waigel, Germany’s finance minister, at a time…

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