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Blaming “globalisation” for inequality just lets national governments off the hook

The modern, interconnected world does not render them powerless

By Simon Tilford  

Did Donald Trump rise to power off the back of grievances about globalisation? Photo: Xu Jinquan/Xinhua News Agency/PA Images

Donald Trump, Brexit, populist pressures across the EU: are we entering a full-blown crisis of international liberal capitalism? There is no doubt that globalisation poses policy challenges for governments. But globalisation by itself did not force governments to adopt policies that have divided their countries, exacerbated inequality and hit social mobility. Many of them did that by choice.

The problem is not that we have opened the way for…

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