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Why in 2020 I couldn’t stop listening to the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band

In a surreal year, the band’s humour was a perfect balm

By Alice Wright  
Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band on Dutch TV, 7th June 1968. Left to right: probably Neil Innes & an unknown bass player. Credit: Wikimedia commons

The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band on Dutch TV, 7th June 1968. Left to right: probably Neil Innes and an unknown bass player. Credit: Wikimedia commons

It has been 50 years since the group formally disbanded, but for me the ultimate band of 2020 is the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band. The alternative 1960s outfit’s mixture of trad jazz, English surreal wit and psychedelic pop creates an original collision of language, art and music. In a year that has made us question everything, I found myself returning to their creative, existential questioning.

I have been a fan since I first heard them as a child. I was in my father’s car, aged around seven, when “Hunting Tigers out in India” came through the CD…

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