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Grime—a very British musical genre

Once reviled, with artists like Stormzy and Skepta grime has now come of age

By Joy White  
Stormzy calls out Theresa May at the 2018 BRITS © Victoria Jones/PA Wire.

Stormzy calls out Theresa May at the 2018 BRITS © Victoria Jones/PA Wire.

Stormzy calls out Theresa May at the 2018 BRITS ©Victoria Jones/PA Wire.

All you need to become a grime MC are lyrical skills and the courage to perform. There are no financial barriers to entry. And at a time when the public school-educated pop star seems more common than ever, this is the beauty of grime—and one reason why it is a musical art form that matters in 21st-century Britain.

When grime first entered the public consciousness, it came with the tired stereotypes of guns, gangs and knives—just as hip-hop music…

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