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A life in lost objects—one woman’s reflections on love and grief

Sophie Ratcliffe is a self-confessed lover of small things

By Zoe Apostolides   May 2019
Journalist Kate Field features in The Lost Properties of Love © Wikimedia commons

Journalist Kate Field features in The Lost Properties of Love © Wikimedia commons

This blend of memoir, biography and criticism begins in September 1988, when the teenaged author is “waiting for my father to die.” The combination of fondness and pity Ratcliffe exhibits for her former self—dressed “for a day of corpse-viewing” in “a three-quarter-length navy sweatshirt with an ersatz-Victorian plasticised picture of a floral bouquet on it”—sets the tone for a work that spans many years…

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