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Author Archives: Peter Bazalgette

Smallscreen

What do you call a war drama where a real soldier plays himself and troops video their own invasion? Welcome to Generation Kill
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

The BBC's Iran and the West, by acclaimed producer Norma Percy, is a timely reminder of why we pay the licence fee
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Dickens founded a tradition of ghostly Christmas stories that's still alive and well on our TV screens. Just don't let Jonathan Creek anywhere near it
Peter Bazalgette  

Public service narrowcasting

Multi-channel television and the internet are killing public service broadcasting as we have known it. Instead, let's use the subsidy to turn Britain's remarkable creative and artistic talents into public service "narrowcasters"
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

BBC drama and Channel 4 documentaries could be your best allies during the credit crunch. Just don't let Niall Ferguson write your one-liners
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Most of the Brit commentators tramping around America this season have missed the point. More4's drama, John Adams, is the true text for our times
Peter Bazalgette  

Who needs digital privacy?

A new generation of digital tracking technologies can now follow your every move, unleashing a world of personalised adverts. Privacy campaigners are furious. But embracing these tools may be the only way to save the media from bankruptcy
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

There's nothing real about "reality" TV these days. Which is why we should just let Supernanny loose on The Family and see what happens
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

With its novel approach to the Holocaust, a BBC2 "talking heads" drama rebuts David Hare's claim that the single play on television is dead
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Britain has woken up to the dramatic quality of HBO's The Wire. But the programme also reveals how our TV viewing habits are changing
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

The Guardian says adult fans of Doctor Who are "pathetic." Well, that's me then. Russell T Davies's reinvention of the BBC classic has been brilliant
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Good sitcoms are rare these days because broadcasters are too quick to axe new shows. Comedy needs time to grow roots—consider C4's Peep Show
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Just when reality television shows start to look stale, they reward us with moments of gloriously unexpected drama. Take The Apprentice
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

Set in the swinging, sexist 1960s, Mad Men lets us relish political incorrectness safely. Meanwhile, advertising today could be entering a golden age
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

The new Five News has broken the mould of news bulletins. Macho newshounds may sneer, but viewers like it, and other broadcasters may follow
Peter Bazalgette  

Smallscreen

The ITV series Moving Wallpaper/Echo Beach is clever, postmodern stuff—but is it what viewers want straight after Coronation Street?
Peter Bazalgette  

House proud

Big Brother has often played an important role in challenging stereotypes—the most recent series was no exception
Peter Bazalgette