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The pandemic exposed Britain’s loneliness generational divide—but it’s not the one you think it is

Loneliness is less determined by what happens to you, and more by whether you have the close relationships that you want and need—and it's the young who are suffering

By Jason Murugesu  

This was the year of postponed celebrations and shrinking opportunities for spontaneous socialisation. No more small talk by the office coffee machine. Birthday parties were cancelled. Weddings—if they went ahead—were low-key and without the pomp.

But how lonely did you actually feel? The data suggests that while Britons have struggled with feeling lonely…

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