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How did Virginia Woolf enjoy her pudding?

Odes to cakes and sweets throughout history

By Ian Irvine  

1928, Virginia Woolf in A Room of One’s Own describes a luncheon party at King’s College, Cambridge hosted by Dadie Rylands:

“And no sooner had the roast and its retinue been done with than the silent serving-man set before us, wreathed in napkins, a confection which rose all sugar from the waves. To call it pudding and so relate it to rice and tapioca would be…

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