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The adventures of Louise Bourgeois, spider-woman

Only recognised late in life, Bourgeois produced powerful, predatory art about the female experience

Louise Bourgeois and Couple 1 (1996) © COLLECTION THE EASTON FOUNDATION, ARTIST ROOMS: NATIONAL GALLERIES OF SCOTLAND AND TATE, GETTY IMAGES

When Tate Modern opened on London’s South Bank in the year 2000, its visitors were confronted with what remains one of the most powerful works to appear in the Turbine Hall. Three mysterious metal towers accessed by spiral staircases rose 14m from the floor—one enclosed in a rusted steel skin, two others furnished with large mirrors, each platform with a sculpture of a mother and child inside a bell…

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