Issue

Prospect Magazine

Issue 135

June 2007

Contents

Subscribe to Prospect

For richer and for poorer

Paul Collier
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Two new books offer contrasting explanations for why some countries fail to develop: one blames culture, the other trade liberalisation. Though both analyses are flawed, neither can be dismissed. Attitudes in poor countries often do need to change, while protectionism can play a role in helping Africa to industrialise

The democracy of Don Quixote

prospect
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Novelists have always turned their hands to essays, and the essay-writing novelist remains a literary force to be reckoned with. The two forms share an inherent pluralism and scepticism that makes them natural allies of democracy

Tax credits: the success and failure

William Davies
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The story of Gordon Brown's tax credits policy is a mixed one. Billions have been directed to the low-paid, helping to take the edge off rising inequality. But the failure of the policy's architects to consider its real-world application has impeded successful delivery

A Cuban death rehearsal

Bella Thomas
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

With Fidel Castro apparently on the verge of death, I returned to Cuba to visit old friends. Little has changed over recent years and life for most Cubans remains harsh. Yet western visitors continue to romanticise the place

My brother the bomber

Shiv Malik Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

What turned Mohammad Sidique Khan, a softly spoken youth worker, into the mastermind of 7/7?

Towards the day

Kamran Nazeer Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Prospect's Thomas Pynchon correspondent is battling his way through "Against the Day"—and recording the experience

Mary Douglas remembered

Geoff Mulgan Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The anthropologist Mary Douglas, who has died aged 86, produced a framework for understanding society that should be part of the mental furniture of every educated adult

Hay diary

Leslie Lee Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Reports from Britain's premier literary festival

What Luttwak didn't say

Charles Glass Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Edward Luttwak is right that the middle east is not important enough to fight over. That's why the US should withdraw from Iraq and stop providing aid to Israel

Myths of British ancestry revisited

Stephen Oppenheimer Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Stephen Oppenheimer responds to readers' questions and comments on his October 2006 article on British ancestry

First Drafts—the Prospect blog

David Goodhart Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Prospect's editorial blog is now live, and you can read it here

Open letter to Tariq Ramadan

David Goodhart Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Last week the Islamic scholar and reformer Tariq Ramadan argued in the Guardian for an end to calls on British Muslims to integrate. Here, Prospect editor David Goodhart replies

The Washington folly

Erik S Reinert Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Paul Collier's review of my book failed to take into account the disastrous effect on developing countries of following the advice of the IMF and World Bank

Gormley's spaces

F David Peat Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Antony Gormley's Hayward exhibition stimulates the mind and senses—and may even provide a refutation of artificial intelligence

Beyond Sidique

Yahya Birt Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Shiv Malik reads too much into one case study

Why Sidique?

Kishwer Falkner Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

There's more to extremist Islam than crises of identity

reply to Baggini

Halima Begum Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The psychology of bombers

Michael Bond Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

What can psychological research tell us about why some people turn to violent extremism?

March of the HiBrits

David McWilliams
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

For 50 years, the children of Irish immigrants have been the most important innovators in England's popular culture

Gordon's go

Robert Hazell
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Tony Blair's departure leaves much constitutional business unresolved. It's up to Gordon Brown to finish the job

Against unhappiness

Richard Layard
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Paul Ormerod is splitting hairs over methodology. People want to be happy, and politicians should try to help

Defending Hodge

Julian Baggini
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The belief that those who have lived in a community longest should have housing priority isn't racist

Challenging Chomsky

Philip Oltermann
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Universal grammar is the most important theory in linguistics. Has the language of one tribe now disproved it?

An unusual oilman

Derek Brower
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

John Browne turned BP into the oil industry's leanest machine, but his cost-cutting now looks like a liability

End of the book postponed

Nicholas Clee
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Technology is not yet changing our reading habits. But the electronic book, the rise of the online retailer, the blog and the print-on-demand book all provide real challenges for booksellers and publishers, and some may not survive. Still, the future of the book itself looks bright

Chaos and horror

Erik Tarloff
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Don DeLillo, an undoubted master, has a gift for creating an atmosphere of inchoate dread. Yet his latest novel feels flat and static and lacks a sense of purpose. At least it has a superb ending

Life on planet Boyle

Mark Cousins Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Mark Cousins looks at Danny Boyle's varied and innovative career

Lives not led

William Skidelsky
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Hard-headed and surprisingly right wing, Lionel Shriver does not fit the conventional image of a novelist. Her latest work is a subtle examination of the difficulties of decision-making.

The poverty of liberalism

E K
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The individualism and universalism of western political elites are on a collision course with the popular desire for moorings in time and place. The nation state cannot be replaced by global norms

Private view

Ben Lewis Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The work and public images of Tracey Emin, Sophie Calle and Isa Genzken conform eerily to national stereotype. Which of these artists will become Miss Venice biennale 2007?

Between the lines

Jason Cowley Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Cormac McCarthy's dislike of publicity has made him one of the commanding absences of American letters. But the huge success of his latest novel, The Road, may change that for good

Smallscreen

Christopher Hird Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The Apprentice is an absurd caricature of the business world. Why is the BBC so sure the public aren't interested in programmes that enlighten rather than just entertain?

Oration for a dead hero

Petina Gappah
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

My husband died a national hero, exalted by the president. But I know them both for worthless dogs

These islands

Aarathi Prasad Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Belfast has changed beyond all recognition since the IRA ceasefire. But if you come here for a stag or hen night, leave your novelty water pistol at home

Washington watch

Tumbler Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Barack Obama is winning the tussle for top Dem foreign policy strategists, but the party's old farts may yet help Hillary triumph. Plus, bizarre dynamics of the primaries

Inefficient markets

Michael Prest Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

China's stock markets are experiencing a classic speculative frenzy which may lead to a massive crash. And is the spectre of inflation returning to Britain?

Out of mind

Robert Drummond Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

False pregnancy syndrome is a surprisingly common condition. Now, with a minor epidemic on the ward, it seems that even doctors may not be immune

France profonde

Tim King Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Unlike his predecessors, Nicolas Sarkozy takes a practical approach to politics. Unfortunately, this seems to mean mythifying the French nation and rewriting history

Rivers of Babylon

Nibras Kazimi Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Iraqis are indignant about the wall being built around Baghdad's Adhamiya area, site of the Sunni insurgency. But the US is right to proceed; it will save Sunni and Shia lives

Lab report

Philip Ball Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

The only use of the Large Hadron Collider anyone cares about is finding the Higgs particle. But the LHC's opening has been delayed. What if someone else gets there first?

Brussels diary

Manneken Pis Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

How well will the new French president get on with the new British prime minister? The British ambassador to the EU isn't going to hang around to find out

Modern manners

Lesley Chamberlain Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Holidays are about becoming enchanted by short-term habits. Noises don't annoy us, and even bus timetables seem fascinating. But then we return, and the spell is broken

Editorial

David Goodhart Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Letters

prospect Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

News and curiosities

prospect Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Will's words

William Skidelsky Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Grayling's question

AC Grayling Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

Enigmas and puzzles

Ian Stewart Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135

In fact

prospect Free entry
30th June 2007  —  Issue 135







Search by Issue



Most Read